The Masterpieces of Shirley Jackson Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Edit Profile

RAMSEY CAMPBELL » Discussion » The Masterpieces of Shirley Jackson « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Steve Jensen (Stevej)
Username: Stevej

Registered: 07-2009
Posted From: 82.0.77.233
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 02:01 pm:   

For those, like me, who want to learn from a master (or should that be 'mistress'?), The Masterpieces of Shirley Jackson is available for only 6.50 on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1854874373/ref=s9_simz_gw_s0_p14_t1?pf_rd_m=A 3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-1&pf_rd_r=1XDAFH3ADK7X2GBMXZTD&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p= 467198433&pf_rd_i=468294

Masterpieces features several short stories including the classic The Lottery, The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Huw (Huw)
Username: Huw

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 218.168.183.147
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 02:54 pm:   

An essential volume for anybody who does not already own those books. If you added Come Along With Me and Just an Ordinary Day (mostly for for more short stories), you'd have a pretty comprehensive collection of Jackson's weird fiction output.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Llewellyn Probert (John_l_probert)
Username: John_l_probert

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 213.253.174.81
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 03:08 pm:   

I've got this very volume! Excellent value for money. It was published by Raven books which was the short-loved horror imprint of Robinson (I think they did Best New Horror 6 under it)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 03:34 pm:   

I've only read the short story 'The Lottery' - an incredibly disturbing and ahead of its time nightmare vision of a possible future for conservative small town America (or anywhere - and living in Ireland I really mean "anywhere").

And of course the tour-de-force novel 'The Haunting Of Hill House' - one of the three best horror novels of the 20th Century for me along with 'The Ceremonies' & 'The House On The Borderland' That's why Shirley belongs in my Top 20 and I am itching to read the rest of her brilliantly psychological and multi-layered output.

For me the best means the best... not flash in the pan flavours of the month, or even the decade or the generation for that matter.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Hubert (Hubert)
Username: Hubert

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 78.22.229.114
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 04:35 pm:   

I own the Noonday Press edition of The Lottery and Other Stories, as well as the three Penguins The Haunting of Hill House, We Have Always Lived in the Castle and The Sundial. While I've always liked Hill House, her short stories curiously fail to 'speak' to me. I have yet to read the other novels.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 04:41 pm:   

I always feel weird with collected volumes. It's like while reading a story it's infected by it's fellows. Does that sound daft?
Also, for sheer bulk, I hate the recent bradbury best-ofs/collected volumes. They are like breeze blocks, and physically unpleasant to read, like the poor Aickman's.
'New from Penguin - the Komplete King! Three feet thick with letters the size of molecules!'
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:02 pm:   

Have to disagree Tony, I've had my eyes on those Bradbury collections since I first spied them.
For me owning the stories and being able to read them whenever I like always comes before having to have each specific story collection.

I felt the same way about the 2 volume complete short stories of J.G. Ballard & 5 volume Philip K. Dick sets.
It's the stories first and foremost for me, though I agree to have the original collections would be preferable but just not practical on a limited book-buying budget.
Oh for all 40-odd Aickman stories in one volume...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:07 pm:   

You haven't heard about the two Aickman volumes?!?
I'd have the books, the big volumes, but prefer portability.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:11 pm:   

What two Aickman volumes?!?!

You're not serious... they haven't, tell me they have - Oh Lord (I'm down on my knees now reembracing my lost faith and everything)!!!!

To be able to read all those many, many stories of his I never have. Twould be the closest literary equivalent to a spontaneous orgasm I can imagine...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joel (Joel)
Username: Joel

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.37.199.45
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:16 pm:   

"I always feel weird with collected volumes. It's like while reading a story it's infected by its fellows. Does that sound daft?"

Not at all. It's like buying real albums as opposed to massive boxed-set compilations that feel impersonal and cold. The issue is availability (and price), however. But having bought numerous reasonably-priced, inclusive compilation volumes I then found physically hard to read (not least because of narrow margins and fragile spines), I really sympathise.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:19 pm:   

And aren't casual readers enticed by the word 'complete'? Would they pick up all the separate volumes? I like these recent boxed Bonds and Sherlock Holmes; a box of Bradburys presented in such a way would be absolutely beautiful.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:21 pm:   

Stephen - those two volumes have been out for ages but are very pricey. I had to SAVE UP for mine, and make do with tatties. Anyone got a link? Some smaller (and cheaper) collections have been reprinted recently, but not complete.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:23 pm:   

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_w_h_?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=a ickman&x=9&y=23
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:26 pm:   

And aren't casual readers enticed by the word 'complete'? Would they pick up all the separate volumes? I like these recent boxed Bonds and Sherlock Holmes; a box of Bradburys presented in such a way would be absolutely beautiful.

You said it... beautiful beyond words. Oh to live in a perfect world (sigh).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:29 pm:   

Let's become publishers!
:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Steve Jensen (Stevej)
Username: Stevej

Registered: 07-2009
Posted From: 82.0.77.233
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:32 pm:   

The two Aickman volumes are priced at...1500 squids! *cries a lot*
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.44.39.227
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 05:43 pm:   

You know, only a few years ago you would have got them for sixty, like I did. God, I feel for you.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Huw (Huw)
Username: Huw

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 218.168.192.156
Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 - 06:14 pm:   

I always like to have the original collections and novels in their 'normal' state (i.e., one single volume), like Joel and Tony. But sometimes the 'collected' or 'complete' editions are convenient, or collect a lot of otherwise hard to find material.

For those looking for Aickman collections, keep an eye open for inexpensive (relatively, I suppose I mean) copies on eBay and ABE. They do pop up from time to time - usually library copies of the original hardbacks without dust jackets, or less than pristine paperback copies (Aickman's first three collections were issued in both soft and hardback). The easiest collections to go for are probably the book club editions of Painted Devils, Cold Hand in Mine and The Wine-Dark Sea, and if you have these three you'll have a good portion of his work. Night Voices is usually fairly inexpensive, even in good condition.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 - 12:16 pm:   

I can see a Shirley Jackson project coming on me soon.

Of the nine novels she wrote how many would be considered horror/weird fiction and what genres do the rest fall into?

'The Road Through The Wall' (1948)
'Hangsaman' (1951)
'The Bird's Nest' (1954)
'The Witchcraft Of Salem Village' (1956)
'The Sundial' (1958)
'The Haunting Of Hill House' (1959)
'And Baby Makes Three' (1960)
'We Have Always Lived In The Castle' (1962)
'Famous Sally' (1966)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Huw (Huw)
Username: Huw

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 61.216.32.174
Posted on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 - 03:17 pm:   

Stephen, the following can be considered supernatural (or, at the very least, weird) novels:

The Sundial
The Haunting of Hill House
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Hangsaman and The Bird's Nest are both mainstream novels dealing with psychological issues (isolation and mental disintegration are a recurring theme in Jackson's writings), but I don't know anything much about The Road Through the Wall, And Baby Makes Three, and Famous Sally. The Witchcraft of Salem Village is non-fictional, as are Raising Demons and Life Among the Savages (the last two deal with her family life).

There are also the short stories, of course. For my money, the better ones are collected in Come Along with Me - 'The Beautiful Stranger', 'The Summer People', 'A Visit' (aka 'The Lovely Night'), 'The Bus' and others are some of the best weird stories ever written, in my opinion. The book also includes the beginning of her unfinished novel Come Along with Me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 82.4.20.22
Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 - 01:17 am:   

Thanks, as ever, for the info Huw.
I already have 'The Haunting Of Hill House' and will make a point of getting the short story collections you mentioned and those other two novels. Also might have a go at the psychological novels.
Much happy reading ahead (well, disturbing anyway)!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 - 12:53 pm:   

I've done a bit of double-checking and she only actually wrote 6 novels.

'The Road Through The Wall' is a disturbing depiction of an outwardly polite/inwardly vicious small ultra-conservative community who exclude all outsiders or anyone not considered of themselves - like a novel length continuation of the themes she nailed so memorably in 'The Lottery'.

'Hangsaman' is about the mysterious and unexplained vanishing of a teenage girl from a strict college and is loosely based on a true case - shades of 'Picnic At Hanging Rock'!!

'The Bird's Nest' is about the mental disintegration of a young woman plagued with multiple personalities.

While the books listed as novels on the Fantastic Fiction website are:
'The Witchcraft Of Salem Village' is a historical account of the infamous witch trials written for children.
'And Baby Makes Three' is a guide for new young mothers!
'Famous Sally' is a Roald Dahlesque children's book.

I think I'll read all of her major novels now!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Huw (Huw)
Username: Huw

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 218.168.186.239
Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 - 04:25 pm:   

Good idea, Stephen! I keep meaning to revisit Shirley Jackson's work. I bought We Have Always Lived in the Castle and The Haunting of Hill House for my niece and nephew recently. Last year it was Lovecraft.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Steve Jensen (Stevej)
Username: Stevej

Registered: 07-2009
Posted From: 82.0.77.233
Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 - 02:00 pm:   

By the way, folks, The Haunting is only 2.99 at HMV:

http://hmv.com/hmvweb/simpleSearch.do?searchUID=&pGroupID=5&adultFlag=false&prim aryID=5&simpleSearchString=The+Haunting&btnSubmitSearch.x=10&btnSubmitSearch.y=1 4
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tom_alaerts (Tom_alaerts)
Username: Tom_alaerts

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.78.35.185
Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 - 05:08 pm:   

About the Tartarus Aickman two-book set.
Since several of his stories are very hard to find now (but you can get quite a good selection easily), this two volume set is the only feasible answer even if it's out of print, and rather expensive.
However, while I tend to love Tartarus books, I do think that this set is a bit disappointing. Especially considering the price, I think it would have been reasonable to expect a three volume set with bigger fonts and wider margins. Currently it's not really a pleasure to read in these books - a rare disappointment for a Tartarus book!
So, I kept my 3-4 cheap other Aickman collections (originally planned to sell them when getting the 2 volume set) and I only refer to the set for the stories that I don't have elsewhere.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.132.170.85
Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 - 07:26 pm:   

Ditto.
Anyone else encountered the work-out that is the collected Bradburys? they almost need a trailer.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.132.170.85
Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 - 07:30 pm:   

Seems she was even more versatile than we expected;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dont-Come-Around-Here/dp/B002FRN4PY/ref=sr_1_36?ie=UTF8& s=dmusic&qid=1250270970&sr=8-36
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.255.148
Posted on Wednesday, August 19, 2009 - 04:46 pm:   

She's still relevant... and apparently Michael Douglas is a fan....

-------

Title: WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE
Logline: The reclusive Blackwood family -- primarily of sisters Merricat and Connie and their uncle Julian -- are forced into seclusion after the mysterious lethal poisoning of several of their family members six years earlier. Merricat, who is the younger sister, cares for the agoraphobic Connie, while the ailing Julian increasingly is in the grip of his own obsessions. The plot thickens when a long-lost cousin arrives and seeks to secure the family's fortune.
Writer: Mark Kruger
Agency: WME Entertainment
Prod. Co: Furthur Films
Genre: Thriller
Logged: 8/18/2009
More: Adapted from Shirley Jacskon's 1962 novel. Further's Michael Douglas will produce.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.72.14.113
Posted on Wednesday, August 19, 2009 - 04:50 pm:   

The plot of that sounds very similar to Francis Ford Coppola's debut 'Dementia 13' (1963). I wonder...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joel (Joel)
Username: Joel

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 217.37.199.45
Posted on Thursday, August 20, 2009 - 01:31 pm:   

"Anyone else encountered the work-out that is the collected Bradburys? They almost need a trailer."

For people who don't know his work, you mean?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gary Fry (Gary_fry)
Username: Gary_fry

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 86.26.90.161
Posted on Thursday, August 20, 2009 - 01:51 pm:   

Oi! I did a trailer joke the other day!

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration