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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.255.119
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 02:56 am:   

I'm probably seeing this long after all of you already have, but can I say...? Wow! What a kick-ass film that was! If this isn't Terry Gilliam at his best, then it's got to be one of his top three films. I think it's his best by far myself, now.

TIDELAND, in tone and style and feel, to me, you could say, is the film THE DEVIL'S BACKBONE was aspiring to be years earlier, and that PAN'S LABYRINTH also wished it could have been... it shows a maturing of style that - had Peter Jackson taken the right path after HEAVENLY CREATURES - he might have ended up here, instead of a pounding fantasy epic and eventually the dull, forgettable KING KONG and finally (according to what Stephen reports) THE LOVELY BONES. Not to mention, Tim Burton at any time, had Tim Burton ever matured beyond visual candy (BIG FISH is Tim Burton doing sickly sweet sentimental fantasy, instead of plumbing poetic depths like Gilliam did here)... I'm hoping for ALICE IN WONDERLAND, but after seeing TIDELAND - a deliberate, subtle take on that same fantasy, on one thematic level (TIDELAND's based on a contemporary novel, it seems) - I doubt it could stand up to this. Well, I won't pre-judge that one just yet.

This is a very dark fantasy, if not quite dark; and a rich and disturbing horror novel, if also not quite horror. It is sweeping like a novel in feel, though, but not bloated - not a wasted moment or shot in the entire film, that I was able to catch. I just was floored by it. I had a friend recommending it to me for some time, but... I'm glad I finally got around to this... and I figured it deserved its own thread within which to praise it....
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 11:36 am:   

I'm seriously behind the times in what Gilliam films I've seen - nothing since 'Twelve Monkeys' (which was high up in my Top 10 movies of the 90s). This seems to be because his films never get a long run in any of the local cinemas (usually only a week - if even that) and I've kept missing them.

I'm hoping my local arthouse cinema will someday show a retrospective of his work as I find his films only really come to life on the big screen. 'Tideland' is the one that I'm most looking forward to...

As for 'The Lovely Bones' - you've hit the nail on the head, Craig. 'Big Fish' was another load of twee wish-fulfillment rubbish full of sickeningly sentimental CGI visuals that just didn't work at all! However, it wasn't half as patronising as Jackson's effort.

Please don't take my word for it though - perhaps I'm just a grouchy old cynic. Watch the film for yourself and make your own mind up.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 05:07 pm:   

I wasn't keen on Lovely Bones. Too soft, as Goldilocks might have said.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.5.3.138
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 05:08 pm:   

I find as I get older, less desire to see that which I "know" - sometimes it's just through trusted reportage, like yours, Stephen, on THE LOVELY BONES - to be less than worthy. Sometimes biographical facts come into play in such watchings: I had intended to rent EVERYBODY'S FINE, but it was out (btw: talk about sickly sentimental elitist shallow garbage posing as tear-jerking feel-goodery! What the hell was I thinking?!), and then tried watching a library DVD of an old film EYES IN THE NIGHT, which for some reason my player wouldn't play. Nothing else looked good on my shelves, and in a fit of ennui, I decided to put in BIG FISH, which a friend had loaned me some 2 years back, and of which I probably would have returned soon unwatched had I not been driven to it by events beyond my control (). I am glad I did, because it kind of thematically matches TIDELAND; they remind one of the other, once both are seen.

So I'm not sure I will see THE LOVELY BONES unless fate drives me to it. I was unsure whether Peter Jackson was slipping during the LOTR films, a minority view I understand. Then I was highly disappointed by KING KONG - this was a return to THE FRIGHTENERS, imho, a return to studio-slaving empty nothingness, though in KK it was (I felt) a masturbatory creation to satisfy some inner need, beyond any other consideration. I'll say this for Michael Bay (and, honestly, I'm not a Michael Bay worshipper, people!): he at least has the entertainment of his audience as his primary goal, however often pandering and/or eye-candy intense (the same goes for Tim Burton I think, in his defense).

From what little I've learned about you, Stephen, here on this board, I implore you to not do what I did: I am quite serious, go out today or as soon as possible, and rent TIDELAND - drop all other films you are intending to see, and go see this one - don't even read the box or discover anything about it, if you at all can, just get it and put it in and watch it, like I did. I'll give you your money back if you're not as amazed as I was....
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 05:44 pm:   

I trust your opinion too, Craig, and know I'm in for a treat.
I've been a fan of Gilliam's off-the-wall humour and disturbing surrealism since his days as animator on 'Monty Python's Flying Circus'.

Let's see, aside from 'Tideland' I've also yet to watch; 'Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas', 'Lost In La Mancha' [I know he didn't direct this but in a way he did create it], 'The Brothers Grimm' & 'The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus'.

What did you think of those, Craig?
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 06:24 pm:   

Brothers Grimm is disappointing to say the least.

Fear and Loathing is another must-see.

I missed teh Imaginarium myself so I can't say anything about that (or lost in la mancha).
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Allybird (Allybird)
Username: Allybird

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 80.47.103.170
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 08:10 pm:   

Stephen...Twelve Monkeys is one of my favourite films.

I like Fear and Loathing, Weber - give it a go.

The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus. Didn't like the interior world....too Monty Pythonish.

From the Telegraph.
'These dreamscapes are the filmís best hope, and there are certainly images that linger Ė Plummerís face wrapped around a giant hot-air balloon, a candy-lane curving up against an ambrosial sky, or Tom Waits, as a dandyish Devil, sauntering on clouds. Still, we already feel Gilliamís imagination rubbing up against his constricted budget, and CGI showmanship is not on any level his forte. You miss the hand-made charm and extravagant matte-work of Brazil, even Baron Munchausen, which this film resembles most in narrative technique. And itís a sharp jolt back into the underlit grunge of the present, where Plummer and his acolytes look like smudge-faced Victorian castaways, scavenging amid the Thames debris.'
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.5.13.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 09:14 pm:   

Stephen:

LOST IN LA MANCHA - not really a Terry Gilliam film, being a documentary about the aborted making of something that never fruited. But as a documentary? Wonderful! It's great to see Johnny Depp in a behind-the-scenes way, even if those moments, like all things ever caught on camera, are probably FOR the camera....

BROTHERS GRIMM, never saw, and now I realize: going back to my post above, I sorta figured it wasn't too fantastic - in fact, I had seen portions on TV, and wasn't impressed. This is why I must have balked on seeing TIDELAND for so long, I think, and why I've yet to see THE IMAGINARIUM OF DOCTOR PARNASSUS, though I may have to give that one a go now.

FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS is splendid, but it's sort of an anti-film... it defies all form and structure, or at least, it's not conventionally structured. Rent it along with Bill Murray's WHERE THE BUFFALO ROAM, for comparison/contrast.
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Allybird (Allybird)
Username: Allybird

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 80.47.103.170
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 09:20 pm:   

You know what though..............































Donnie Darko rocks..
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Mick Curtis (Mick)
Username: Mick

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 86.176.102.160
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 10:09 pm:   

Hah! TIDELAND is excellent, though, but then I've always said Gilliam is a god.
Mind you, I REALLY didn't like Brothers Grimm.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.5.8.96
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2010 - 10:20 pm:   

Ally, I've given up on the DONNIE DARKO thing... so nyah-nyah-nyah.

I would like to know if anyone here as seen the sequel, S. DARKO?... What is it like?

Also, did anyone here actually see SOUTHLAND TALES?... Or - say, THE BOX is now at my local rental palace... do I dare?...
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 10:36 am:   

I like Fear and Loathing, Weber - give it a go.


I loved it, that's why I said it's a must-see.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:05 am:   

The Box - I really didn't like. It started very well, but then after a while seemed to deliberately go off in another direction, and keep looking for other directions, just for what felt like the fun of it. It was uninvolving and boring to witness. I'd say give it a go.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:06 am:   

Heavenly Creatures is Jackson's best film. What happened to him? Did he fear losing his audience's love? It's like that director died.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:09 am:   

HATED Big Fish.
I wish producers would learn that production values count for nothing, effects count for nothing. It's crippling everything, that notion. TV, everything.
Just watched The Lives of Others last night; anyone seen? I thought it felt like the sort of film Spielberg would make or remake. It had a lot of his touches, reminded me how good he used to be, able to mix fear and humour up in one scene.
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Allybird (Allybird)
Username: Allybird

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 80.47.103.170
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:26 am:   

S. Darko was pants.

Weber. I thought that you'd heard so many good things about it so it was a must-see. You a big Hunter fan Weber? I've got the Rum Diary.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:44 am:   

Tony, I saw 'The Lives Of Others' in the cinema at the time and it blew me away - an amazing work of art as well as a gripping neo-noir thriller and fascinating insight into the Orwellian realities of life in East Germany in 1984.

It was also profoundly moving in a way so few films are these days... the final scene in the bookshop floored me!
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:52 am:   

The bit with the joke in the canteen was horrible, wasn't it? Great film.
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 11:52 am:   

I've got Better than sex and F&LILA. Loved the book of F&L but I've not read the other one yet.

I really liked the Box when I saw it at the cinema. Definitely flawed - it needs some of the top levels of explaination trimmed to make the whole thing a bit more ambiguous and add to the genuinely creepy atmosphere he manages for most of the film - but IMHO well worth watching.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 12:21 pm:   

I would never miss any new release by Tim Burton but he can be incredibly frustrating at times.
He has an originality of vision that verges on genius but is frequently hampered by his own uncontrollable self-indulgence (the cinematic equivalent of Prince). When he's on form there isn't a director alive today can touch him but when he loses the plot (as with 'Big Fish') the results can be very messy indeed!

The Tim Burton movies I've loved:
Beetlejuice (1988)
Batman (1989)
Batman Returns (1992)
Ed Wood (1994)
Mars Attacks! (1996) - grossly underrated!
Sleepy Hollow (1999)
The Corpse Bride (2005)
Sweeney Todd : The Demon Barber Of Fleet Street (2007) - and I hate musicals!

Those I've loathed:
Pee-Wee's Big Adventure (1985)
Planet Of The Apes (2001)
Big Fish (2003)

Those I could take or leave:
Edward Scissorhands (1990)
Charlie And The Chocolate Factory (2005)

Needless to say I'll be one of the first in the queue to see 'Alice In Wonderland' next week!
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 12:24 pm:   

My faves? Scissorhands, Sweeney, Mars. I really liked Pee Wee and didn't mind Apes, actually.
I thought Corpse was really bad!
One you missed; Nightmare before Christmas. We love that one in this house.
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 12:33 pm:   

Tim Burton didn't direct Nightmare before christmas...
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 12:35 pm:   

Nor Corpse! But it was his 'thing'...
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 12:46 pm:   

He did direct the Corpse Bride.

Henry Selick directed Nightmare.

Interesting piece of trivia - Tim Burton's A Nightmare before Christmas was the first film from the Disney studios that featured another director's name in the title of the film. And ironically, as mentioned, TB wasn't the director of the film...
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 12:48 pm:   

Burton directed 'The Corpse Bride' but not 'The Nightmare Before Christmas' - which I absolutely adore!!

That was by Henry Selick who also directed 'James And The Giant Peach', 'Monkeybone' & 'Coraline'.

I agree that Tim Burton's creative input was all over TNBC and without him it wouldn't have been half as memorable.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.247.217
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 04:53 pm:   

Stephen - you didn't like PEE WEE'S BIG ADVENTURE?!? How can you say that?!? It remains (sadly) the best film he's ever done!
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 05:01 pm:   

The main character didn't do it for me, Craig.
In fact I could barely watch the film without cringing.

I've been told it's an American thing lol.

For me Burton's best and most gloriously extravagant remains 'Mars Attacks!' - inspired lunacy that pissed all over the great steaming pile of kack that was 'Independence Day' released at the same time.
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Huw (Huw)
Username: Huw

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 220.138.164.42
Posted on Thursday, March 04, 2010 - 12:31 am:   

I like a lot of his stuff, but it feels to me as if Burton's been making the same film for the last decade or so, if that makes sense. They all feel so samey.

Ed Wood is my favourite.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 01:35 pm:   

Oh dear, I'm getting danger bells going off in my head about the new 'Alice In Wonderland'... why have they made Alice a 19 year old?!

Surely the whole point of the story is to show young childhood's innocent acceptance of the weird and fantastic. I wonder what Tim Burton has in mind with this adaptation? Hoping to see it tomorrow night if not booked out.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.224.229
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 04:17 pm:   

It got not great ratings out here - but it also made ungodly amounts of money opening weekend, the 6th best opening for ANY movie EVER, so I've heard... egad....
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 04:29 pm:   

It's got matt Lucas in. I won't be able to watch it - for my own sanity.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 04:40 pm:   

Just heard from a mate in here that Burton admitted in interviews that this is his reinterpretation of 'Alice' that probably won't be liked by the purists.

When it comes to cinematic adaptations of great literature I'm afraid he means ME... still wouldn't miss it though.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 05:42 pm:   

Fuck yes!!

Just discovered my local arthouse cinema is showing 'Rosemary's Baby' tonight. Never seen it on the big screen and haven't watched it at all in donkey's years.

It's my second favourite horror film of all time (after 'The Exorcist') and an absolute fucking masterpiece! Woohoo!!
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 03:03 pm:   

That was some experience last night... one of those films you are sucked into from the very first shot and that doesn't release its hold for a second. Flawless imho.
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Ramsey Campbell (Ramsey)
Username: Ramsey

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 195.93.21.74
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 03:46 pm:   

Alas, I found Burton's Alice depressingly conventional, not least because of the largely witless script. It sometimes feels as if Burton's visual style has simply been imposed on the material (rather as the 3D was apparently imposed in post-production).
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:02 pm:   

Stephen; I hadn't read Rosemary's Baby but the other day when looking through it to see how a good author tackles moving house I was immediately sucked in and felt I was reading perfect writing. Even on such scant evidence of a few pages I feel I have found an all time favourite horror book, up there with House Next Door and Haunting of Hill House (too many Ramseys to single out, I hasten to add).
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:04 pm:   

Stephen; after watching The Exorcist (the director's cut) I came away feeling the film was about group consciousness. Did you get that? It made it a much richer film after that.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:07 pm:   

I'm hoping to see it tonight, Ramsey, so will let you know what I think... initial vibes aren't good.

The last time I heard Tim Burton say he was "reimagining" something the result was his misguided remake of 'Planet Of The Apes'.

My own favourite of the many 'Alice In Wonderland' adaptations is Jan Svankmajer's nightmarish "live action with stop motion" version 'Alice' (1988). Was lucky enough to see it on the big screen two years ago along with a whole season of his films - was a pretty sleepless month!
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:24 pm:   

Um... :-(
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:24 pm:   

Guess what, Tony, I have the fully restored version of 'The Exorcist' on DVD and have yet to watch it. Seen the original version three times, twice in the cinema and it gets better and more nuanced with every viewing. I see it as about the very real power of 'intense religious faith/belief in the supernatural' and how that can be subverted into madness as well as used for great good - the eternal dichotomy of humankind.

Every now and then I take the DVD down and salivate over it but keep saying "not yet". I'm keeping it for some Halloween night when I've nothing else on and want to wallow in the greatest horror film ever made as I've never seen it before... oh yes.

Once I've finished 'The Count Of Eleven' (should be tonight) I've already left out Blatty's novel and 'Legion' (never read it) for my next horror reads.

I've never read 'Rosemary's Baby' and plan to as soon as I find a decent second hand copy. Last night was the fourth time I've watched the movie and it also gets better every time - I was in heaven.
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Weber_gregston (Weber_gregston)
Username: Weber_gregston

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.176.105.56
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:28 pm:   

Last time TB said he was re-imagining something he produced his career low point to date - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. makes Planet of the Apes look like a Magnum Opus.
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:39 pm:   

Yeah, CATCF was pretty uninspired and paled into insignificance beside the Gene Wilder version but I'd say 'Planet Of The Apes' & 'Big Fish' were much worse.

The last decade was a pretty schizophrenic period for TB.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:40 pm:   

God, I envy you that Stephen, a bit. It has cgi, but one of the jumpiest scenes I've ever seen - I did literally jump in the air.
But yeah; Group consciousness. The book touched on it, too.
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Jonathan (Jonathan)
Username: Jonathan

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 91.143.178.131
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:45 pm:   

Stephen. I have a copy of Rosemary's Baby if you want to borrow it (the book that is). Let me know if you need my e-mail address again.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.233.86
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:47 pm:   

Burton's ALICE IN WONDERLAND once again seems to fit Craig's Rule, which (down here in the L.A. area at least my rule seems to hold for me, not sure how it is anywhere else) is this: The amount of public visual ads for a film (billboards, movie posters, bus-stop canvassing, etc.) is directly proportional to how poor a film actually is... and lemme tell you, there were just a million goddamned posters and billboards for this friggin' movie all over the friggin' place....

And now I'm going to mention another thing I'm starting to wonder about - people who go to movies for the "visuals." I was noting to some people how this film got poor reviews - I'm not seeing it for the movie, people would say, I'm seeing it for the "visuals." The SFX, same argument I constantly heard for AVATAR. Perhaps we will soon enter the realm of pure spectacle in film, sans traditional structures and storylines - a whole new form of visual storytelling, that can be quite exciting, in the right hands - had Tim Burton, say, been able to abandon all traditional forms of storytelling, and been just allowed to wreak his wacky havoc on the screen, would he perhaps have done a better job of it all?...
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:50 pm:   

That would be great, Jonathan, but it may be a while before I get reading it - if you don't mind.

I take it you received 'The Ghost Light' back okay?
It was a tremendous read and has me hooked on Leiber now. Nearly two thirds through 'Lankhmar' and got 'Night's Black Agents' & 'Shadows With Eyes' to read after that (thanks to Huw).
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.233.86
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 04:52 pm:   

ROSEMARY'S BABY I've seen many many times, and it never gets old, never loses its freshness... a movie you start to watch, and get sucked in all over again....

Hey, come to think of it... I rewatched, for the nth countless time, HUSBANDS & WIVES the other night, another compellingly re-watchable film, and for my money, Woody Allen's finest moment... a film that every time you see it, you see something you didn't see before... and it too has Mia Farrow in it... and then, wait, CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS, another Woody film I've seen over and over and over, and again Ms. Farrow... my god, have I accidentally stumbled across my hitherto-unknown favorite actress all along?!?...
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 05:08 pm:   

I think Kubrick was a near absolute visual director. And Hitchcock. Are we talking visual or pretty here?
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 194.32.31.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 05:17 pm:   

Mia Farrow was superb in RB.

I actually found myself filling up for her as her big innocent face filled the screen and she descended into paranoid desperation - breathtaking acting. Cassavetes was equally good - a complete swine who had me muttering and making fists with hatred all over again.

That film doesn't half engulf you while you're watching - an awesome achievement by Polanski and indisputably his masterpiece.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.233.86
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 05:28 pm:   

The uneasiness of half-heard conversations, of open doors through which you hear voices... I remember hearing or reading that's what Polanski was doing in this film... when I think of RB, I think immediately of doors and doorways... intentional? doorways, literal and symbolic, into evil?... the banality of evil, with that final scene, which is both hilarious, and deeply unsettling, as I'm sure Polanski intended....

Tony: no, when I hear people say this, it means less about breathtaking visuals like you mean, and more about, say - the best analogy would be: Let's all go get our eyes stoned at the movies today.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 07:19 pm:   

Yeah, Craig. Less and less am I amazed by the quality and content of the beautiful image, the clarity of it. In fact that's it; people are keener and keener to have 'clear' images, not images that are worth anything particularly.
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Tony (Tony)
Username: Tony

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 81.131.110.123
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 07:20 pm:   

Case in point; RB is about what we don't see being the most potent.
Wow...I love stuff like this.
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Craig (Craig)
Username: Craig

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 75.4.228.108
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 07:32 pm:   

Tony - amen - in fact, the film that has most "haunted" me (i.e., keeps returning to my mind, unbidden, keeps swirling around in my thoughts) since I've seen it, and more than other films in probably the last year or so that I've seen (i.e., rating a film's "haunting half-life"), is the film I saw a few months back, THE HEADLESS WOMAN (LA MUJER SIN CABEZA) - a film so understated as to be almost somnambulant, so subtle as to be almost undetectable, so straightforward as to be documentary... and yet visually arresting somehow (for being so seemingly unconcerned with "style"), and overall, deeply unsettling... beats even the glitzyness of the this thread's nominal film, I dare say... maybe I'm just no longer able to be stirred so much by the sugar-saturation anymore, I dunno....
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Stephen Walsh (Stephenw)
Username: Stephenw

Registered: 03-2009
Posted From: 82.17.252.126
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 - 12:53 am:   

Never got to see 'Alice In Wonderland' tonight - all shows booked out.
So it looks like it might be a couple of weeks before I manage to squeeze this one in...
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Mick Curtis (Mick)
Username: Mick

Registered: 03-2008
Posted From: 194.106.220.19
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 - 01:29 am:   

We've booked up to see 'Alice...'in 3D Imax in a few weeks...

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